Used Car Pricing

A Guide to Buying Used Cars for Less


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When you're looking to sell your old vehicle or thinking about buying a used car, a used car price guide can come in very handy. There are a number of factors that affect the final price, including the vehicle's overall condition and who you sell to or buy from. If you buy from a used car dealer the price is going to be quite different than if you buy from a private party. If that vehicle qualifies for its manufacturer's certified pre-owned program it will cost a noticeable amount more. Similarly, you can get much more if you sell to a private party as opposed to trading your car in at a dealership. The car's age and mileage are also major factors in calculating its worth. Remember that the trade-in value, private party value and suggested retail value will all be significantly different from each other.

You can buy used cars for less by completing research online before you finalize your decision. Seeing as used car pricing is in a constant state of flux, it's important to complete your research before visiting the dealership, as they sometimes prey on unprepared customers. By making use of online tools, you can get an idea of the fair market value of a vehicle. The following tips will help you as you search for used car pricing:

Get an Idea of the Fair Market Value

Since used cars don't have suggested retail values, it's important to complete lots of pricing research. Checking classified sites can give you an idea of what certain vehicles are selling for in your area. Remember that these prices are simply asking prices, so you could probably get a better deal by negotiating. You may also want to check a service like Kelley Blue Book to see what the vehicle's approximate trade-in or wholesale value is. This amount is probably within $1,000 of the dealership's cost for a car.

Contact Dealerships Online

Contacting dealers or private party sellers online can be a great tool when considering used cars for sale. Let them know that you're requesting multiple quotes and that you will go with the lowest for a comparably equipped vehicle. If dealerships are not responding via email or the Internet, you can make offers via fax or the phone. Some dealerships focus on high sales volume and are likely to take your request very seriously.

By doing a little research and contacting the dealership before you visit the showroom, you can negotiate a great deal that will let you buy used cars for less.

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